Category Archives: Election

Candidates’ Statements – Traffic Congestion

Prior to our all candidates’ meeting on Tuesday November 4th, we asked the candidates if they could respond in writing to some questions. We didn’t have time to ask all the questions in the meeting, and so we based the questions that we did ask on the ones we presented in written form. The questions cover the following areas: The Delbrook Recreation Center Site (November 7), Local Government Transparency (November 9), Development Cost Charges and Parks (November 10), Child Care (November 11), and Traffic Congestion (November 12).

Thanks again to all the candidates for taking the time to meet with us on Wednesday night, and to compose thoughtful responses to our questions.

Answers are shown in the same order as candidates are posted on the DNV website, and have been pasted verbatim from the material presented by the candidates, and formatted to fit this page.  I apologize in advance for any errors in reformatting these responses for the website, and commit to fixing those errors as soon as I can after they have been pointed out to me.

The Delbrook Community Association does not endorse any of these responses.


Traffic on the entire North Shore continues to get worse with much more congestion and delays than ever before. As residential development continues to ramp up it appears the problems are going to be exponential going forward. Bike lanes and transit will help but the reality of increased overall automobile traffic is a given.

If elected, what options will you consider/promote to facilitate greater flow of traffic within the District of North Vancouver and over to the Vancouver side of Burrard Inlet?

ROGER BASSAM

For the past three years I have been the Council Liaison to the MOTI Community Working Group for the Second Narrows Interchanges project. That group has helped the MOTI develop a number of options that will help separate the highway traffic from the east west flow that wants to go to and from the Seymour and Lynn Valley areas. I also have championed these changes at Council which led to the DNV acquiring the Keith Lynn School site (re-purposed Public Assembly land) and the creation of the Keith Road Extension. Next year will see the Keith Road Bridge replaced with a 5 lane bridge that will accommodate better, safer cycling and pedestrian traffic while accommodating the higher traffic volumes we are seeing in the area AND forming a critical link in the east – west flow for Seymour traffic. For more information and a look at a possible configuration of the northern part of the new interchanges please visit my website www.RogerBassam.com.

JIM HANSON

I support improved transit. I support improved bike lanes if they can be made to co-exist and not detract from vehicle traffic. Most importantly, I support a new east-west road (in the vicinity of the current road system and with a minimal environmental impact) to allow North Vancouverites to travel across the North Shore without recourse to the Trans Canada Highway.
As for crossing Burrard Inlet, in the short term I support the operation of the third Sea Bus. Longer term, I believe we must consider additional crossings.

WAYNE HUNTER

Current road and highway infrastructure cannot support current demands or sustain any future development, without upgrades which allow for the free flow of East/West traffic on the North Shore and the approaches and exits on the two major bridges. The investment(s) required will require funding contributions from both senior levels of government which will be announced in the near future. In addition, we must negotiate within the region for our fair share of the projected transit investments following next year’s Referendum on the $7.5 Billion Regional Transit Plan. For us that will mean an additional Seabus, more buses, and bike lanes.

Finally we must do all we can to KEEP the Bus Transit Depot on the North Shore.

KEVIN MACAULEY

It has been the main issue so far in the campaign. Our community here in the Edgemont Delbrook area has been the main conduit for detours when the highway is backed up. Ridgewood through to Queens and Lonsdale where never designed to accommodate the traffic on such occasions and it is only getting worse. Now that I have stated the obvious.

There is no one quick easy solution. For event caused traffic issues , such as accidents on the highway. We could work with the emergency people and mostly the police in trying to find ways to mitigate the traffic delays by clearing the scenes more efficiently. I have been on many many of theses accident scenes and I know that there are some efficiencies in the process.

For day to day traffic, we need to put servicing in place con current or prior to development. We need to continue, and I know there is some progress being made , to push other governing bodies to step up to improve highway access and egress.

We need to be better serviced by Translink, in my opinion we are under served for our portion of the Translink cost. public transportation needs to be more accessible and more frequent and remain at a reasonable price. we need to try and have some of the discounts and services for handcart re instated and improved to help with those who are less mobile.

Bike lanes would help but most likely for a small minority.

HAZEN COLBERT

I offer a transportation platform based on three fundamentals (1) Investing in highways and bridges that are core to economic expansion, business investment and moving people & goods (2) Improved public transit in the form of express buses and Seabus expansion to move people, and (3) Traffic Demand Management of key corridor roads by eliminating street parking during rush hours, co-ordinating traffic lights, removing traffic lights where they serve no purpose and building pedestrian overpasses

LINDA FINDLAY

There is already much being done by DNV to alleviate the east/west flow of traffic for residents of DNV. Because funding for these enhancements involve not only DNV but Provincial and Federal levels of government, timing of these announcements and initiatives are in the hands of others. Look for a significant announcement from the Provincial government on November 12th. If elected, I will advocate for further pressure to be brought on the Provincial and Federal governments to address Highway 1 issues. I also would advocate for a committee to coordinate with CNV and WVD project builds, traffic flows and timelines so that not all builds/projects are happening at the same time.

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

We are in discussions with the province to improve the three bridgehead interchanges to improve access and egress and east/ west flow. There will be an announcement next week that this work is starting.

In the short term I would advocate for a further expansion of the Blue Bus Transit Network. In addition, the Translink 10 year plan which is going to referendum next year includes more buses, seabus and improvements to the phibbs exchange and the seabus exchange.

GLENN MACKENZIE

MATHEW BOND

  1. Increased overall automobile traffic is not a given, it is a choice. Over the past 60-70 years, we have chosen to build a community that is dependent on the automobile for personal mobility. We have spent a vast amount of resources building a complete network of roads, but we have not invested enough resources in building a complete, connected network of walking, cycling and transit facilities. My first transportation priority would be to provide our citizens with a real choice between transportation modes.
  2. Every person in our community under the age of Sixteen cannot drive a car. Do they not deserve individual mobility, or is it only those citizens who have the age, the wealth and the desire to drive an automobile? We need to place a very high priority on making it safe, easy and convenient for our youth to not only get to school, but have the freedom to move around and participate in our community.
  3. Current analysis shows that citizens, especially those under the age of 30, are driving less than they used to. They prefer to live in compact, complete communities and are open to walking, biking, transit, and car sharing to meet their mobility needs.
  4. As our citizens age, they may become less and less able to use their automobiles as their primary form of transport. Redevelopment of the town centres into complete communities, with an emphasis on pedestrian safety and accessibility, can provide an option for those citizens who want to remain in their community, close to the support networks and services they require.
  5. Investing in additional road capacity would be lowest on my list of transportation priorities, specifically if it is intended to reduce congestion. Studies from across North America have shown that adding road capacity does not reduce congestion, it only encourages more people to drive. In Los Angeles, $1B dollars was spent over the past five years to add an additional lane to the I-405 freeway. Traffic is slower now than it was before. Was that a good use of $1B dollars? With limited government funding, we need to decide on what the most important. Investing our limited funds to continue and lock in the pattern of automobile dependence in our community is not a wise long-term decision.

LEN LAYCOCK

Transportation in DNV is a disaster and it will get worse. If elected, I will compel a complete rethink of the entire approach. Right now it is shocking that Council does not have even the most basic information to address how this major issue can be solved. Council does not have a clue what to do. Council actually thinks they can build there way out of this mess! Madness is in the air. Read “Transportation, Traffic Congestion and Traffic” at www.lenlaycock.org . Better yet , print it:

Out of control. Trending worse.

Each time a big new development comes along, sensible citizens always ask, ‘How will the District assure this new development does not worsen traffic congestion?’. The question is never effectively addressed. Which brings us to the present. At a recent Council meeting, DNV staff acknowledged they are greatly challenged by these problems.

Proposed solutions include the need to “shift corporate culture”, break down “silos”, add more staff, more traffic fines, and new technology. These are all expensive ‘after the barn door’ reactions to ongoing citizen complaints.

District staff follow the direction set by Council. Within Council there’s continuing momentum for more and wider roads, for ever more automobiles. But in our District, we have finite boundaries of mountains and water. More pavement for more vehicles is not a good solution. That trajectory leads to a bad place – and yet, reading DNV reports on transportation, Council’s preference for building more automobile infrastructure remains the priority. Transit, cycling and walking are referred to as merely “alternative transportation”. Illustrative of this bias is incumbent Councillor Bassam’s financial alignment with developer Tim Horton’s, revealing his preferences for ‘drive thrus’, and idling cars. We get what we design for.

Attending a recent Council meeting, it was eye opening to discover Councillors lack meaningful quantitative and qualitative information about sources of traffic congestion – how much traffic is locally generated, or from neighbouring communities, or just passing through, or where traffic is going, or why. Without well grounded facts, it is not surprising Council has failed come to grips with these problems.

ROBIN HICKS

Population growth is inevitable as Vancouver is one of the most desirable places in the world to live and a depository or safe haven for the newly wealthy in emerging nations to invest their money. Vancouver now rates only second to Sydney, Australia, in the cost of real estate. We have an Official Community Plan and a regional strategy of about 1% increase per year over the next 20 years, one of the lowest in the region.

My strategy falls into two components. The first is the number 1 highway which has a number of choke points; the Lions Gate, the Ironworkers and the Capilano River which allows only 2 road crossings. Dealing with the Cut and the Second Narrows Bridgehead, we have in partnership with the Province and the Feds started a fairly major reconfiguration which will make Keith Road and the new 5 lane Keith Bridge a major artery which will allow more traffic to enter the highway seamlessly and also we have entered negotiations to provide a new direct overpass to connect into Seymour. There are plans to provide a new wider Mountain Highway overpass and more entries and exits to the Highway. The Province has future plans to reconfigure the roads around the Bridgehead and Transit will be upgrading the Phibbs Exchange. The Lions Gate Bridge unfortunately cannot be widened further but the connecting roads Capilano and Marine Drive have been upgraded and will be further improved as development occurs and a priority established for more express buses. The other choke point is the Capilano River crossing on the Upper Levels and that will require major work and expenditure by the Province, maybe a new wider bridge crossing.

The other component is local and collector roads. All new major development will be focussed in the designated town centres and accompanying these buildings will be road and transit upgrades financed partly if not completely by the developer. Again unfortunately early residential development in the District will not allow widened roads but we will be encouraging more frequent transit and more bike lanes. We also will be continuing our sustainable approach to maintaining our local roads through our asset management program which is a leader in the Province from a financial perspective.

Above all we do not want to simulate major US Cities in building more roads which has resulted in gridlock , pollution and ugliness.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

We need to look at phasing large development projects to allow infrastructure to catch up…as well, we are continuing our work with the Ministry of Highways to redesign the 2nd narrows bridgehead in order to alleviate current congestion….working with our neighboring municipalities and partners is crucial in coordinating internal and external traffic issues.

Candidates’ Statements – Child Care

Prior to our all candidates’ meeting on Tuesday November 4th, we asked the candidates if they could respond in writing to some questions. We didn’t have time to ask all the questions in the meeting, and so we based the questions that we did ask on the ones we presented in written form. The questions cover the following areas: The Delbrook Recreation Center Site (November 7), Local Government Transparency (November 9), Development Cost Charges and Parks (November 10), Child Care (November 11), and Traffic Congestion (November 12).

Thanks again to all the candidates for taking the time to meet with us on Wednesday night, and to compose thoughtful responses to our questions.

Answers are shown in the same order as candidates are posted on the DNV website, and have been pasted verbatim from the material presented by the candidates, and formatted to fit this page.  I apologize in advance for any errors in reformatting these responses for the website, and commit to fixing those errors as soon as I can after they have been pointed out to me.

The Delbrook Community Association does not endorse any of these responses.


Cities are responsible for many local regulations, such as development zoning, and can require that child care spaces be included in new buildings.

School Boards can ensure stability for the child care programs for parents and children that operate on school sites.

Municipal governments can endorse the $10/day Child Care Plan calling on the provincial government to begin building a better child care system.

If elected, what will you do to increase the number of child care spaces in our community?

ROGER BASSAM

As an incumbent I have supported child care throughout the DNV and believe Child Care can be provided in many forms and locations. The recent time I have not voted for a Childcare facility was actually in the Delbrook area when an application was made for a location that already had several Childcare providers operating in the area including immediately adjacent to the proposed site. As in all things we have to find a balance between providing services and amenities and maintaining peace and quiet enjoyment of our neighbourhoods.

JIM HANSON

I believe child care is important. I believe both Provincial and Federal governments should co-ordinate a national child care policy. At the same time, I will promise to do what I can to promote child care spaces at the civic level.

WAYNE HUNTER

I believe your question should be for “Licensed” child care spaces, and I would (through my Council) advocate for (1) increase in Minimum Wage, (2) increased funding allocation of child care spaces (3) Expansion of early childcare education (4) continuation and increase in Child Care Credits from the Federal Government.

KEVIN MACAULEY

Child care has been a concern for the redevelopment of Delbrook ( along with the other community services on the site) There diffidently needs to be consideration on site for childcare. With the potential move of the non profits to the lower Capilano ‘village’ it leaves the daycare in a bind. Is it reasonable to have people travel that much further to drop kids off? In our neighbourhood there a few in home a daycare providers and that has not been with out controversy ( traffic, parking safety). I don’t know the answer to the funding issue as this has been an ongoing provincial and federal issue for many years. I can only honestly commit to participating in any way I can to help resolve and ease the burden on families.

HAZEN COLBERT

See below

LINDA FINDLAY

See below

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

Yes, I always have been supportive, my voting record shows that.

GLENN MACKENZIE

MATHEW BOND

The District has a supportive Child Care Policy that was last updated in 2008. I would support this policy and continue to engage citizens on how the policy could be improved and strengthened.

LEN LAYCOCK

See below.

ROBIN HICKS

As Council we generally provide favourable consideration to new daycare applications meeting all the regulations except when we perceive safety concerns or the local area residents’ object for valid reasons. We also seek to retain current daycares as was the case with the Lynn Valley Church redevelopment. I would in this next term request of staff a review of the overall daycare situation ,identify where there is a deficit and invite proposals in that vicinity. I commit also to engage more comprehensively with the School Board in the design of new schools to ensure we partner in the provision of sports fields , gymnasiums, and daycare facilities.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

I think we need to look at what opportunities the municipality may have, ie Delbrook, as well as working with the school district and the rec commission on suitable space for daycare and before and after school care.

If elected, will you endorse (or advocate for) the $10/day Child Care Plan?

ROGER BASSAM

In principle yes but the details of any such program must be reviewed before I would endorse a specific program. If the $10/day rate came with too many restrictions on who could provide day care and where it may do more harm than good. A better policy may be to offer a 100% refundable tax credit to family.

JIM HANSON

I will endorse the $10 per day childcare plan.

WAYNE HUNTER

YES, but I’d like to “test” the costs and benefits as outlined by the Generation Squeeze Team researchers at UBC. The projected cost(s) could only be absorbed at a time when the anticipated increased tax and royalty revenues are generated from a new provincial LNG industry.

KEVIN MACAULEY

See answer above

HAZEN COLBERT

If I am elected, I will be new to Council. Before taking a position, I want to hear from all stakeholders.

LINDA FINDLAY

I would advocate for the $10/day Child Care Plan

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

I believe that the provincial government should be doing more to help. I would endorse it.

GLENN MACKENZIE

MATHEW BOND

Yes.

LEN LAYCOCK

You have raised an important issue . Children are precious and families need options, but the devil is in the details. Achieving what you describe is complex.

Before commiting I need to study this carefully, and I am very interested in what you suggest.

ROBIN HICKS

I would support this type of plan. I am also supportive generally of the free Scandinavian model.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

Young families consistently struggle with affordable childcare on the North Shore. There are never enough spaces for any kind of child care and we need to work together to address these issues, I would be elated if the Province would support this 10 dollar a day campaign, I am skeptical though…with the challenge of the cost of living on the North Shore, for most families 2 incomes are a requirement, we need to be creative in offering solutions. Delbrook would be a perfect location to envision this kind of programing within this building.

Candidates’ Statements – Development Cost Charges and Parks

Prior to our all candidates’ meeting on Tuesday November 4th, we asked the candidates if they could respond in writing to some questions. We didn’t have time to ask all the questions in the meeting, and so we based the questions that we did ask on the ones we presented in written form. The questions cover the following areas: The Delbrook Recreation Center Site (November 7), Local Government Transparency (November 9), Development Cost Charges and Parks (November 10), Child Care (November 11), and Traffic Congestion (November 12).

Thanks again to all the candidates for taking the time to meet with us on Wednesday night, and to compose thoughtful responses to our questions.

Answers are shown in the same order as candidates are posted on the DNV website, and have been pasted verbatim from the material presented by the candidates, and formatted to fit this page.  I apologize in advance for any errors in reformatting these responses for the website, and commit to fixing those errors as soon as I can after they have been pointed out to me.

The Delbrook Community Association does not endorse any of these responses.

accessible public park space. In 2013, District Council drastically reduced the amount collected through Development Cost Charges allocated to parks. For apartment residential land use [based on 800 sq feet] the reduction was 67%. For townhouse land use at 1250 sq ft, the DCC for parks was reduced by 69%.

For over 70 years, since the initial development of our community, the Delbrook community has, on a number of occasions, unsuccessfully sought an allocation of family oriented park space. The only designated green space set aside in the 1950’s for the residents of Delbrook was the playing fields which remain today named ‘Delbrook Park’. The tennis courts and tot lot were added later. The district is blessed with many trails and sports fields, but these are not ‘people’ parks. Our goal of having a gathering place oriented for families and neighbours has never been realized.

Will you commit to an effort to create a neighbourhood park for the Delbrook community? Will you commit to an enhanced revenue source to fund much needed family parks?

ROGER BASSAM

I disagree with the premise of the question. I lived at 777 West Queens (across from the tennis courts) when my family arrived in North Vancouver in 1983. Delbrook Park is a ‘people park’ and me and my ‘people’ spent many hours in that park and on the trail network in the community. There simply isn’t a shortage of park space in the Delbrook area. Additionally, the changes to the DCC policy around parks reflected that fact that ‘restricted’ DCC funds are not an effective way to manage DCC’s across the District. I can also state the DNV had built up a significant Park DCC fund and traditionally found it difficult to allocate that money effectively given the restrictions. (Northlands for example) Finally, we should celebrate the fact that the DNV is over 75% green space; Parks, PRO and Natural Parkland. We are fortunate to have so much green space and we are committed to keeping what we have from being developed.

JIM HANSON

I believe every neighbourhood is enhanced by a community park. We commit to using our best efforts to expand our neighbourhood park system, including in the Delbrook Community. As to the revenue sources, I am not fully aware of the current revenue sourcing but commit to ensuring that funds are available for necessary parks.

WAYNE HUNTER

YES

KEVIN MACAULEY

I would be open to looking at where a park could be developed and what that would cost etc. I like the concept of public space and a park but until the old Delbrook site issue has been resolved it is difficult to focus on that. It may be able to be incorporated into the Delbrook site.

HAZEN COLBERT

Yes.

LINDA FINDLAY

I commit to exploring all options in an effort to create a neighbourhood park for the Delbrook community. I commit to an effort to explore enhanced revenue sources for a neighbourhood park.

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

I will and would welcome a community delegation with a petition to initiate engagement.

As a member of the Finance and Audit committee, I will bring the issue of an enhanced park development revenue source to that Committee. In addition, I commit to arranging for a member of this community to attend to present the concerns of the community.

GLENN MACKENZIE

MATHEW BOND

A neighbourhood park in Delbrook has been identified in the Parks and Open Space strategic plan, and is a long overdue addition for the citizens of the Delbrook area. The disposal or repurposing of the Delbrook community centre lands could provide a potential revenue stream through development CACs to provide a neighbourhood park. However, this needs to be a community driven decision, discussed through a rigorous process of public engagement. It must to be noted that there are competing priorities for funding. The District is currently holding a $28M debt to assist in the financing of the new $48M William Griffin rec centre. Two options for paying down this debt are general revenue (taxes) or offsetting the cost by repurposing the Delbrook site for development. There may be others that are identified through the public process.

LEN LAYCOCK

I need more information and study of this before answering intelligently.

I commit to meeting with Delbrook residents to listen and learn more about what you have in mind. I agree with the direction you are talking about, but I defer until I hear more from you.

ROBIN HICKS

As a previous Director of Finance I helped to write the Development Best Practises Manual for the Province. Parkland dcc’s are raised to primarily acquire parkland but also to provide some limited development such as washrooms and trails etc. We also can demand a 5% contribution of land on all new development and a community amenity contribution from a developer which could include the provision of a park component as part of the development configuration. There are therefore a number of revenue sources available to provide a neighbourhood park which I will commit to explore as part of any redevelopment of the Delbrook site.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

yes

Candidates’ Statements – Local Government Transparency

Prior to our all candidates’ meeting on Tuesday November 4th, we asked the candidates if they could respond in writing to some questions. We didn’t have time to ask all the questions in the meeting, and so we based the questions that we did ask on the ones we presented in written form. The questions cover the following areas: The Delbrook Recreation Center Site (November 7), Local Government Transparency (November 9), Development Cost Charges and Parks (November 10), Child Care (November 11), and Traffic Congestion (November 12).

Thanks again to all the candidates for taking the time to meet with us on Wednesday night, and to compose thoughtful responses to our questions.

Answers are shown in the same order as candidates are posted on the DNV website, and have been pasted verbatim from the material presented by the candidates, and formatted to fit this page.  I apologize in advance for any errors in reformatting these responses for the website, and commit to fixing those errors as soon as I can after they have been pointed out to me.

The Delbrook Community Association does not endorse any of these responses.

 

Responses to a freedom of information request to all lower mainland municipalities indicate that the District of North Vancouver has roughly twice the average of closed [in-camera] meetings as other local governments. Issues discussed in-camera included the treatment of community associations. Will you promote open meetings and commit to reducing the number of closed meetings and ensuring such meetings meet the requirements of the Community Charter?

ROGER BASSAM

There has been a lot of misinformation circulating regarding this issue. Unfortunately the DCA has chosen Trevor Carolan to moderate their ACM when Mr. Carolan is one of the worst offenders at propagating this misinformation. In response to the recent accusations the DNV has researched the matter and found the following:

”Council meets formally between 140 and 190 hours per year and the percentage of time spent in camera in 2014 will likely to be close to 25%, the lowest amount in almost a decade and not too far off the 32% average. By way of comparison, when Mr. Carolan served as a Councillor, District Council met 281 times over the three year period of which 109, or 39% of those meetings, were in-camera.”

This information has been submitted to the NS News for publication in rebuttal of the comments in his recent column. I would also add that Council does not meet with ‘developers’ in-camera as has been alleged. Finally, any discussion about community associations – and there has not been any for some time – would almost certainly have taken place during a manager’s update and those are not in-camera.

JIM HANSON

I stand behind open and transparent local government and commit to only voting for closed meetings where it is legally required to do so.

WAYNE HUNTER

I fully support transparency and accountability in municipal governance.

KEVIN MACAULEY

I think considering the apparent discrepancy regionally regarding closed meetings it is worth re evaluating and confirming that they are indeed necessary or adjusting the criteria to reduce the closed events and come more into line with the average. I would certainly be in favour of better transparency.

HAZEN COLBERT

I am on the record of reducing the number of closed meetings. The District should not be a monopoly board where insiders play with real buildings, dining on catered food paid for by the taxpayer. Yes, the closed meetings are catered. I will end that type of lavish spending especially when local soccer teams are facing a 50% increase in field fees.

LINDA FINDLAY

I commit to ensuring that in-camera meeting meet the requirements of the Community Charter.

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

I will promote open meetings pursuant to the restrictions for same contained in the Community Charter- Sections: 90(1) a-o; 90(2); a-e, 90(3); 91(1),(2); 92; and 93

2012 and 2013 were very busy years as the Council began to implement the Official Community Plan. We had: Regular Council Meetings; Public Hearings; Public Information Meetings; Committee of the Whole Meetings; and Work Shops. All were open to the public. The Closed Meeting’s procedure did follow the Community Charter provisions laid out in the first paragraph. The Municipal Clark, under the Community Charter, serves as parliamentarian and interpreter of the both the Community Charter and the Local Government Act. The Clerk is a defined position with specific duties and, as such, sets the agenda. If the Clerk decides that a matter meets the Community Charter criteria, he will recommend closure in public session, citing Section 90 and the relevant section. Council, after discussion as to the appropriateness of that recommendation, must vote to close and enter into IN CAMERA.—in some cases issues have been removed from the In Camera Agenda and moved to the Regular Council Agenda “In Camera” meetings are usually scheduled before a regular Council meeting-usually Monday night. The main reason is that, often senior staff, project staff, governmental representatives are available at that time and would not be later in the evening. Usually, given that 5:00 pm is the supper hour, a light buffet (2-3 items) is provided for council, and staff.

GLENN MACKENZIE

MATHEW BOND

Openness, transparency, accountability are cornerstones of my character and I will bring those values to Council if elected. The District Clerk is required to ensure any closed meetings meet the requirements of Section 90 of the Community Charter.

LEN LAYCOCK

The public’s business should be conducted in public. There may be rare occasions when privacy is paramount, but this should not be regular practice. I like the doors and windows open and the sun to shine in. Let’s avoid the shadow world of politics.

ROBIN HICKS

As an incumbent I can assure you that all of our closed meetings meet the requirement of the Charter. As Councillors we review all items that are on the agenda before the debate/discussion occurs. We hold them before every Council meeting for efficiency and if necessary to consider matters pertaining to legal, land, human resources and jurisdictional issues with other levels of Government. For example we have conducted a series of negotiations with the two Indian Bands and with the City of North Vancouver on personnel and cost sharing arrangements.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

yes, we regularly challenge the Clerk on in camera agenda items…..I think it is important to point out that all municipalities operate quite differently from one another, so what may seem like an easy comparison may in fact be quite difficult from city to city.

Candidates’ Statements – Delbrook Recreation Center Site

Update: Received Glenn MacKenzie’s responses


Prior to our all candidates’ meeting on Tuesday November 4th, we asked the candidates if they could respond in writing to some questions. We didn’t have time to ask all the questions in the meeting, and so we based the questions that we did ask on the ones we presented in written form. The questions cover the following areas: The Delbrook Recreation Center Site (November 7), Local Government Transparency (November 9), Development Cost Charges and Parks (November 10), Child Care (November 11), and Traffic Congestion (November 12).

Thanks again to all the candidates for taking the time to meet with us on Wednesday night, and to compose thoughtful responses to our questions.

Answers are shown in the same order as candidates are posted on the DNV website, and have been pasted verbatim from the material presented by the candidates, and formatted to fit this page.  I apologize in advance for any errors in reformatting these responses for the website, and commit to fixing those errors as soon as I can after they have been pointed out to me.

The Delbrook Community Association does not endorse any of these responses.

DELBROOK RECREATION CENTER SITE

The District of North Vancouver Council has passed resolutions approving a public consultation exploring options for the Delbrook Recreation site (October 2012) and then deferring the public consultation process until 2015 (October 2013). The latter decision was taken in an in-camera meeting and then reported out.

How would you promote successful public engagement for issues in the District including options for the Delbrook Recreation site? How would you determine whether or not this public engagement had been successful?

ROGER BASSAM

The District has a very good engagement program. Over the past decade we have engaged in very large programs like the OCP and many smaller engagements like the Parks and Recreation Master Plan, several town centre detailed design engagements and most recently the discussion of Coach Houses. We measure success by both the level of engagement and the quality of the feedback received.

JIM HANSON

We support broad, numerous and meaningful public engagement on civic issues. It was clear at the Delbrook all-candidate’s forum that members of the community did not feel listened to which, in my view, determines that the public engagement has not been successful to date.  I propose that we could have more meetings outside of elections to discuss local issues.

WAYNE HUNTER

The District is well experienced sponsoring a public engagement process with the DCA and residents in the area. We’ve spent the better part of a decade engaged in the update of the Official Community Plan. The determinants on how to judge the success of such engagement should be established with the community at the beginning of the process.

KEVIN MACAULEY

As you know engaging the public is not an easy quest. I know you have had some experience in your group trying to inform and dialogue with our neighbourhood. So I think that it has to be a multi pronged approach , online, print , face to face ( door to door where feasible) and certainly well timed open public meetings. I guess the best way to measure the success is within the process a trackable response program and then a follow up at each stage of engagement.

HAZEN COLBERT

Public engagement would include interactive town halls and public hearings. Success would be measured by the number of people who attend, and satisfaction ratings they complete at the conclusion of the process.

LINDA FINDLAY

  • Public hearings, written community association submissions, private citizen submissions, council meeting public input stakeholders, emails from citizens
  • All of these avenues are compiled by staff for review by Councillors.

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

We have hired a very experienced Manager of Strategic Communications and Community Relations. She is an expert in this field and will serve as the lead. The communication exchanges will be captured and the attendance at the public hearings will indicate the level of success. But, most important will be her ability to design and deliver an effective communication outreach program and will monitor its progress moving forward. In the final analysis, it will be you, the people, who will determine its effectiveness.

GLENN MACKENZIE

The public engagement process at the district is flawed. Council seems to have predetermined the outcome of the public engagement beforehand. This was true in Lynn Valley, where only a limited set of highrise tower options was presented for residents to choose from, instead of choices thousands of residents sought, including no development. I led the successful campaign in Lynn Valley to reduce tower height from 22 to 5 stories.
Full open public engagement is right at the heart of my 20 years as a teacher at Handsworth. At the heart of public education is the sharing of knowledge and I will bring a new more powerful sharing of knowledge as a councilor.

We need a full, open process including town-hall style meetings where residents can hear each other freely. The measurement of success is in the numbers of residents participating.

MATHEW BOND

A successful public engagement process needs to be flexible, with the ability to provide a safe place for people to talk, share their concerns and discuss ideas. We need to listen to concerns, adapt to address those concerns and build trust.

Citizens need to feel empowered as part of the decision making process, and have a sense of ownership over the development of the project. We need to reach out from the traditional “public hearing” format, which is difficult and not attractive for youth, young adults, and busy families to attend and provide input.

I would consider public engagement a success if we are able to educate the public about the potential project and address specific concerns. Citizens need to understand the options that are on the table in order to make an informed decision. They also need to understand the consequences of rejecting any particular project or proposal.

LEN LAYCOCK

Sometimes the public process is a charade – a kind of going through the motions, then announcing there’s been a public consultation and proceeding more or less as originally planned.

Citizen’s sometimes have the feeling their government is aligned with the developer

of a particular project. No surprise when sitting Council members have accepted ‘grease money’ from developers. We need much better alignment between people and District Hall. Governmentt is meant to serve people. We know we have success when the broad public applauds the decisions of Council. We don’t have that today. For much more info, read “Pace and Scope of Development” and “ Councillors Who Accept Money From Developers” at http://www.lenlaycock.org

ROBIN HICKS

A Steering Committee should be appointed including community members/stakeholders

District Staff and at least two Councillors. Detailed background information should be prepared concerning the site, the buildings, financial information etc. and zoning, OCP designations and potential development scenarios. This group would establish a more extensive public process to be mapped out which would include round table discussions, dialogue, displays and presentations to Council. The views of the local community would predominate in this process.

Success would be determined by a significant proportion of the local community agreeing to the form of future redevelopment.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

A public process called a charrette has been used many times in the municipality to create a vision and determine an outcome supported and built by the local community, it is driven by the residents using a facilitator…..and supported by staff…..the success and support comes directly through the charrette team who provides a series of open houses and discussion to gauge support.

Will you commit to engaging community stakeholders, including community associations in an early process of consultation that would address issues such as the environment, park needs, needs for seniors, daycare, youth and young families for the development of options for projects including the Delbrook Recreation site?

ROGER BASSAM

The District by policy engages with all stakeholders and does so in a timely manner, ensuring we have good community feedback on a broad range of related considerations, such as the environment or impact on specific stakeholders groups, before Council is asked to make any decisions. The District also has a history of re-engaging with the community when the feedback received does not lend itself to clear interpretation or sees the community significantly divided on the best way forward. The Lynn Valley Town Centre process is a good example of that.

JIM HANSON

I am a firm believer in the involvement of community stakeholders and neighbourhood associations in the process of civic government. I am involved in my own neighbourhood association and I see the value in the information that community associations can provide on important decision making at a local level.

WAYNE HUNTER

ABSOLUTELY

KEVIN MACAULEY

Yes I would make a commitment to engage as many people and groups as possible. Often some smaller voices get missed in the process, the not for profit, seniors etc. Part of the foundation of my running for council is to ensure that portion of the population dosnt get forgotten.

HAZEN COLBERT

Yes. Early and often.

LINDA FINDLAY

Yes

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

Yes, and always have

GLENN MACKENZIE

Absolutely I will as councilor. This is one of the key jobs of a councilor. I commit to having an open door to the public.

MATHEW BOND

Yes.

LEN LAYCOCK

Yes. Yes. Yes.

ROBIN HICKS

As indicated above the Steering Committee would establish the process, issues and guidelines, but would need corroboration from the wider local community.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

I have always committed to engaging the community and taking direction from them, I also believe that looking at community benefits and creating partnerships could result in a facility that could encompass a number needs that we are deficient in, ie daycare

When the interests of development projects conflict with the interests of local residents, who should be given most weight in the decision making process?

ROGER BASSAM

This question requires some clarification, a development project is inanimate and cannot have ‘interests’. If you are suggesting that local residents should be given priority on all matters I would suggest the nature of the impacts should determine the relative weighting of the input from various groups. A good example would be the work on the Second Narrows Interchanges. Almost certainly there will be greater impact on some local property owners then on the 90,000 DNV residents that will benefit from the work… Should the local property owners be able to veto that work? Of course not.

JIM HANSON

I stand behind the interests of the residents. The interests of developers and other money making groups must be secondary to the welfare of our community.

WAYNE HUNTER

There are never any easy answers, but given the way the question is framed, clearly the interests of the local residents must prevail. I would hope that through any engagement process, that both the opportunities for development and the interests of a community based quality of life can be one.

KEVIN MACAULEY

I think that there always has to be a balance in the decision making process. There has to be an attitude of stepping back and looking at what is the best for the neighbourhood and how does that impact the community as a whole.

HAZEN COLBERT

Local residents. The success of any project ultimately depends on integration with the existing community. A developer who does not understand that critical success factor might get a project passed through DNV council, but it will not succeed when the shovel meets the ground.

LINDA FINDLAY

Difficult to give definitive answer as to which would be given more weight as it would depend on which specific issue was in conflict. Negotiation and balance is required to achieve what is needed for and wanted by the community at large and the cost effectiveness for planners of development. If it should be a contentious issue that directly would affect the environment or safety I would err on the side of caution and community.

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

I have demonstrated that community comes first and carries the most weight.

GLENN MACKENZIE

Residents should be given most weight in the decision making process, unless there are legal reasons not to.

MATHEW BOND

The interests of both current and future citizens need to be weighed in the decision process. We need to listen and address the concerns of existing residents (following a transparent process of public engagement as discussed above). I don’t think it’s as simple as saying one needs more weight.

LEN LAYCOCK

Local residents should carry weight. The interests of the developer are merely secondary.

ROBIN HICKS

Normally the residents should be given most weight, but in certain situations the broader common good of North Vancouver would have to be considered carefully.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

I think it is a necessity to have the local community and neighborhood support on any project, residential or other…..it is a privilege to rezone and build, not a right. Local interest and must be a priority.

In July the District of North Vancouver Council voted against a bylaw to rezone Public Assembly Land at Braemar School for residential development. Where do you stand on the preservation of Public Assembly land as a District resource?

ROGER BASSAM

I was pleased to champion the creation of a new District Policy that provides a framework from which we can evaluate the benefit of individual PA properties – both publically and privately held – to the community. I have been a strong proponent of retaining public assembly lands.

JIM HANSON

I support the preservation of public assembly lands for public use.

WAYNE HUNTER

Where possible, we should maintain our Public Lands Assembly

KEVIN MACAULEY

I generally believe we should maintain Public Assembly land. There may be times where it is determined that it is definitively in the best interest of everyone to adjust this. More in the case of repurpose rather than just straight up development. An example maybe the old Keith Lynn School which is being repurposed for public use just not a school.

HAZEN COLBERT

Public assembly land should only be disposed of after a referendum.

LINDA FINDLAY

I commit to reviewing each request for rezoning of Public Assembly land based on the site, the projected use, the School District requirements and community input.

DOUG MACKAY-DUNN

I voted against the rezoning of the Public Assembly (PA) land and believe that PA land should be preserved.

GLENN MACKENZIE

Public assembly lands are assets to be preserved for the future. We will fail if we sell off our assets to pay for current operations or special projects. Land is disappearing too rapidly to development. So whenever possible, we must preserve these lands. This includes school lands.

MATHEW BOND

While I believe that we should retain public land for the public benefit, there are a mix of uses for public assembly lands that need to be considered on a case by case basis. It may make sense to retain a vacant school site for public use, but what do you say to the local church congregation that has declining membership and is facing significant costs to upgrade their 50 year old building? They may not be able to move to a smaller space, and there may not be another group willing to purchase their property. If they have to close their doors, and there are valuable community services (daycare, scouts, etc.) that are affected, will the District to pick up the operating cost? If so, how will we pay for it? If elected, I would look at each situation on a case by case basis, engage with the citizens affected to discuss the options, and make my decision based on what was best for the long term interests of the greater community.

LEN LAYCOCK

99% of the time, public land should remain public land. Land, here where we live is finite, and very valuable in the long term. For instance, the ‘ anchor’ feature of all our town centres, should be public space. A ‘Commons’, a ‘Piazza’ or ‘public’ square. I’m open to trading land, if done smartly for public gain.

ROBIN HICKS

I was one of the Council members voting against that development for a variety of factors, the impact on the local area, traffic congestion, dangers to school children and the proximity of the school to the proposed housing. I generally support the preservation of public assembly land. In certain situations a repurposing can be beneficial as with Lynn Valley United Church where the redevelopment includes a new invigorated Church and affordable housing including some social housing and units for the disabled.

CONNIE DE BOER

AMELIA HILL

LISA MURI

I support preserving Public assembly lands.