Debate over housing is becoming heated at the DNV

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The North Shore news reports debates over housing in the District of North Vancouver are heating up.

A motion opening up the possibility of a new condo project near Edgemont Village passed by only one vote this week with Councilors Hanson, Hicks and Mackay-Dunn raising issues about transportation gridlock and a “tsunami of development” in Edgemont and the construction fatigue experienced by residents there.

Councilor Bond argued against any slow down in development. Councilor Hicks sai there ws nothing to be done because highway one was the cradle of our congestion problems, and “That will remain despite all the buildings that go on the North Shore because (the traffic) is due to through-put from east to west and commuters.”

Mayor Walton, who voted wot send the development for review said the light was at the end of the tunnel.

Read all about it here:

http://www.nsnews.com/news/small-condo-triggers-big-debate-at-north-vancouver-council-1.2378776

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DNV council debates transit issues

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An article carried in both the North Shore News and Business in Vancouver reports on Discussions at the District of North Vancouver on the north shore’s growing transit issues.

https://www.biv.com/article/2016/10/district-north-vancouver-council-delves-transporta/?utm_source=BIV+Newsletters&utm_campaign=fc360a5529-Daily_Friday_October_21_201610_21_2016&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_6d3015fdef-fc360a5529-210795293

The article says in part:

Staff’s suggestions included a protected bicycle network, updating the district’s parking policies, a focus on the Main/Marine transit corridor, better co-ordination of traffic signals and whether the district ought to become a vision zero community – a growing movement among cities vowing to design their streets in such a way that there are zero traffic-related deaths or injuries.

But the informal session quickly turned to an airing of grievances as the morning commute of many councillors had been particularly exasperating with near-simultaneous crashes on the Cut, Stanley Park causeway and Westview overpass.

The discussion at Council showed a wide range of opinions among councilors on how to deal with gridlock on the roads.

Councilor Hanson said he did not find the same level of urgency in the Council that he found in the public. Councilor Bond said if people made small changes in their practices would buy time to make transportation investments. Councilor Muri said the answer was fewer people moving to the North Shore with Councilor Hicks responding, We’ve got to learn to live with the population.”

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DNV traffic study looks at possible 300 housing units in “multiple 6-story buildings” as option for Delbrook lands site

At 5:00 pm Tuesday October 18th the District of North Vancouver Council will be holding a workshop to review the District’s Annual Transportation Plan. There is much of interest in the report to Council which can be found here:

http://app.dnv.org/OpenDocument/Default.aspx?docNum=3013732

Of particular interest to Delbrook Community residents is reference in the report to a Delbrook Lands Transportation Study, commissioned by Council in March and completed in June. The transportation update states that the study was completed “As part of the discussion surrounding the future uses for the Delbrook Lands” and “The findings were used to inform the discussion at the Delbrook Lands Deliberative Dialogue session on June 18, 2016.”

The Delbrook traffic study can be found here:

https://www.dnv.org/sites/default/files/edocs/delbrook-transportation-study.pdf

The study looks at the traffic impacts of four options for the site. Three options look at parkland, community facilities, a possible 28 town houses or a combination of the three. The fourth option presented is 300 apartment units in multiple six story buildings.

transport-study

The traffic study looked at vehicle and pedestrian traffic at the four intersections surrounding the property and concluded, “As shown, queues and delays at the study area intersections are expected to be reduced compared to existing conditions as the four land use scenarios generate less peak hour traffic compared to the existing site.” This despite the fact 300 units of housing are reported as requiring somewhere between 390 and 546 parking units.

Also, as the report acknowledges with respect to its traffic study, “Data for the West Windsor Road at Stanley Avenue and Delbrook Avenue at West Windsor Road intersections were collected during spring break in March, 2016.” Presumably, both foot and pedestrian traffic would have been reduced in rush hours when schools were out.

[Edit: An earlier version of this post indicated that the report was withheld from participants of the June 18th meeting. It turns out the report was indeed posted on the Delbrook Lands page under the “Related Policies” section, and we did not see it at that time]

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Should housing take over industrial land in Lower Lynn?

District of North Vancouver residents heard arguments about whether to replace light industrial properties with housing at a public hearing last week.

The North Shore News reports discussions including a statement by one presenter that “Replacing jobs with condos does not make a healthy community.”

“The proposal before council is a six-storey, 63-unit development at the corner of Mountain Highway and Charlotte Road, with six commercial units totalling approximately 5,600 square feet.”

“Council watcher Corrie Kost characterized the project as the “thin edge of the wedge” to wiping out light industrial in the area.”

Half of the proposed new homes would apparently meet the CMHC definition of affordability for for households with an income of $70,000.

The entire article may be found at the URL below.

http://www.nsnews.com/news/lower-lynn-condo-development-debated-1.2362932

 

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